16.32 PetaFlOPS and Counting

18 June 2012

The June 02012 TOP500.org list has the Sequoia supercomputer ranked number one at 16.32 petaflops.

16.32 petaflops Jun 02012 (1.55x in 0.5 year; 55% increase)
10.51 petaflops Nov 02011 (10.2x in 3.5 years; 942% increase)
……………………………………………………….
1.026 petaflops Jun 02008 ( 7.5x in 3 years; 650% increase)
0.1368 petaflops Jun 02005 (i.e. 136.8 teraflops)
……………………………………………………….
teraflops 01996; gigaflops 01985; megaflops 01964

18 June 02012 (Monday):

Intel on Monday introduced a high-performance chip family called Xeon Phi, which provides a stepping stone for the company to reach the milestone of creating an exaflop computer by 2018.

The computing roadmap predicts exascale computing by 02018-02020. Intel’s Xeon Phi announcement makes it appear that the current computing roadmap will be accurate. It is possible we will have exascale computing before the end of the current decade.

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20 Petaflops Coming Soon

31 March 2012

[1 April 02012]
Three years ago, on 1 April 02009, I gave a talk titled 20 Petaflops by 02012. [Yes, I used a 5-digit¬†year.] First quarter of 02012 has ended and as far as I know our computing world has not hit 20 petaflops, but the next TOP500 list doesn’t come out until June. Regardless, I am 99.999% confident that 20 petaflops in 02012 is going to happen primarily because of what IBM announced four months ago.

[25 November 2011]
IBM issued a press release titled IBM Announces Supercomputer to Propel Sciences Forward having the sub-title Blue Gene/Q tackles major challenges of the day, delivers up to 100 petaflops at peak performance.

“When it is fully deployed in 2012 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the system, named ‘Sequoia’, is expected to achieve 20 petaflops at peak performance, marking it as one of the fastest supercomputers in the world.”

IBM.com::IBM Announces Supercomputer to Propel Sciences Forward

[11 November 2011]
The TOP500.org issued the following press release: Japan’s K Computer Tops 10 Petaflop/s to Stay Atop TOP500 List. Japan’s K computer was benchmarked at 10.51 petaflops.

[1 April 2009]
AzGrid::Talk::20 Petaflops in 02012

Two years earlier I gave a talk sub-titled Computing in the 21st Century. During that talk I stated the following: “The next era of computing is the era of High-Performance (Productivity) Computing (HPC).” In addition, during the talk I indicated that peta-scale computing was scheduled to occur in 02008. TOP500.org posted the following on 18 June 02008: “With the publication of the latest edition of the TOP500 list of the world’s most powerful supercomputers today (Wednesday, June 18), the global high performance computing community has officially entered a new realm–a supercomputer with a peak performance of more than 1 petaflop/s¬†[1.026 petaflops]

[4 April 2007]
AzGrid::Talk::The Next Era of Computing


Petaflops processing yottabytes

17 November 2009

I tweeted the following two tweets on 02009.11.16…

  • Jaguar supercomputer hits 1.759 petaflops http://bit.ly/3eInDv

    A supercomputer known as Jaguar has finally bested IBM’s Roadrunner supercomputer in the biannual TOP500 list, but researchers have already begun looking into exascale supercomputers that consist of 100 million cores and run 1,000 times faster than Jaguar.

  • Yottabytes of data via PopSci.com “National Security Agency’s
    Surveillance Data Could Fill Two States by 2015” http://ow.ly/CRGE

    The NSA estimates it will have enough data by 2015 to fill a million datacenters spread across the equivalent combined area of Delaware and Rhode Island. The NSA wants to store yottabytes of data, and one yottabyte comes to 1,000,000,000,000,000 GB.