Hello, World (6 Jan 02016)

6 January 2016

My last posting to this blog was titled The Future is Rapidly Approaching and it was posted on 10 March 02014 (i.e. 667 days ago [1 year, 9 months, 27 days]). Note: This blog was started on 2 November 02009 with a blog posting titled Hello world!

I’ve been learning about the future. I’ve been using  Gerald Thurman on Google+ and the fictional character named nanofoo yottagoo on Facebook as my Learning About the Future blogs.

Here on day 6 of 02016 I’m thinking about bringing this blog back to life, so Hello, World.


The ‘C’ in SCREAMers

13 April 2012

The STEM and STEAM acronyms have become popular acronyms here in the early part of the 21st century. [If I’ve said this n times, I’ve seen it ++n times.]

I’ve never liked the STEM acronym. The first time I saw it I immediately asked “Where’s the Computing?” [And this is said out loud mimicking the way the old Wendy’s lady said “Where’s the Beef?” in those old Wendy’s commercials.] The same “Where’s the Computing?” question applies to the STEAM acronym. Sometime not that long ago I subjected the STEM and STEAM acronyms to the following question: “Where’s the Robotics?”

21st STEM and STEAM depend on Computing, so I originally proposed changing STEM and STEAM to CSTEM and CSTEAM, respectively. There three immediate problems: (0) CSTEM and CSTEAM are not really acronyms. (1) STEM and STEAM are too embedded in our society to change them (i.e. they’re immutable). (2) Where’s the Robotics?

Problem (1) might be impossible to repair, so I’m going to ignore that it exists. Problems (0) and (2) are eliminated with use of the SCREAM acronym. Let the Technology morph into technologies and bury it in the sciences (e.g. biotechnology and nanotechnology), the computing, the robotics, the engineering, the art and the mathematics.

I recently used STEMers and STEAMers to refer to scientists, technologists, engineers, artists, and mathematicians. SCREAMers include those plus roboticists and… oops… computerists? computists? compueers? computicians? computerologists? In those infamous grunts of Homer Simpson… D’oh! Hmm… It would be fun to be able to rewind to when there were no non-human computers and refer to the ‘C’ in SCREAMers as computers. SCREAMers are scientists, computers [humans], roboticists, engineers, artists, and mathematicians.

The ‘C’omputing in SCREAM includes both human and non-human computers. 21st century STEM, STEAM and SCREAM depend on all of us being “computers.”

The following was copied from Wikipedia.org…

The first use of the word “computer” was recorded in 1613, referring to a person who carried out calculations, or computations, and the word continued with the same meaning until the middle of the 20th century. From the end of the 19th century the word began to take on its more familiar meaning, a machine that carries out computations.


Why Yottagoo? (part I)

6 April 2012

The following was my first Yottagoo posting. It was posted on 8 November 02009 (i.e. 880 days [or 2 years 4 months 29 days] ago).

I named this blog Yottagoo because I’m hoping to post a lot of stuff to it over the remaining nine decades of the 21st century. [yotta- is a lot and goo is stuff]

During the early part of the 21st century I started using the handle nanofoo.

Nano- is an SI prefix representing one-billionth of something. For example, one nano-second is one-billionth of a second (i.e. one second is one billion nano-seconds).

Foo is frequently used when something needs to be given a name, but the name doesn’t matter. Sometimes I use foo when I use a profanity (e.g. WTF is What The Foo!)

I initially wanted to connect the 20th century with the 21st century using foonano, but SI prefixes come first so I picked nanofoo instead. [Note: Nanotechnology was born in the 20th century, but molecular nanotechnology is a child of the 21st century.]

Yotta- is a SI prefix representing a factor of one septillion (i.e. 10^24). For example, one yotta-second is one septillion seconds (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 seconds). I picked the yotta- SI prefix because we’re living in an era of large numbers.

Goo has numerous definitions, but in the yottagoo context it’s 21st century form of foo. [Note: ‘g’ comes after ‘f’] In the science fiction realm, via the Wikipedia, goo is a “large mass of replicating nanomachines.”

In a nutshell, yottagoo is a lotta 21st century foo.


Does the future need us?

28 December 2009

Singularity Hub’s A Review Of The Best Robots of 2009 reaffirms my belief that all high school students should be required to read, ponder and discuss Bill Joy’s essay Why the future doesn’t need us.

It might be a serious error to ignore Bill Joy’s opinion.

Our most powerful 21st-century technologies – robotics, genetic engineering, and nanotech – are threatening to make humans an endangered species.

As 02009 nears an end, I continue to claim that we have not yet entered the Age of Robotics, but Singuarlity Hub’s robot review provides evidence that the Robotics Age is rapidly approaching.


Promoting long-term thinking

19 November 2009

I posted the following comment in response to an AzCentral.com posting by editorial writer Joanna Allhands titled “The impact of long-term forecasts.

“30-year economic forecast”… Hee-haw.

“Recovery from this recession could take decades”… I don’t know how you define “recovery,” but I keep “seeing” 02013 as being a major breakout year. In other words, the “recovery” will take decades if we assume one-year decades (and one-decade centuries). Note: I use 5-digit years for a reason. [visit LongNow.org and subscribe to the SingularityU YouTube channel]

Want to get majorily depressed? Investigate “lump of labor.” We’re not yet in the Robotics Age; consequently, this recession’s “recovery” is giving us insight into the “lump of labor” problem that is awaiting us. The next recession has the potential to make this recession look like good times. In a nutshell: We need to start electing 21st century leaders rather than 20th century political dinosaurs.


Why yottagoo?

8 November 2009

I named this blog Yottagoo because I’m hoping to post a lot of stuff to it over the remaining nine decades of the 21st century. [yotta- is a lot and goo is stuff]

During the early part of the 21st century I started using the handle nanofoo.

Nano- is an SI prefix representing one-billionth of something. For example, one nano-second is one-billionth of a second (i.e. one second is one billion nano-seconds).

Foo is frequently used when something needs to be given a name, but the name doesn’t matter. Sometimes I use foo when I use a profanity (e.g. WTF is What The Foo!)

I initially wanted to connect the 20th century with the 21st century using foonano, but SI prefixes come first so I picked nanofoo instead. [Note: Nanotechnology was born in the 20th century, but molecular nanotechnology is a child of the 21st century.]

Yotta- is a SI prefix representing a factor of one septillion (i.e. 10^24). For example, one yotta-second is one septillion seconds (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 seconds). I picked the yotta- SI prefix because we’re living in an era of large numbers.

Goo has numerous definitions, but in the yottagoo context it’s 21st century form of foo. [Note: ‘g’ comes after ‘f’] In the science fiction realm, via the Wikipedia, goo is a “large mass of replicating nanomachines.”

In a nutshell, yottagoo is a lotta 21st century foo.